You might interview and hire someone only two or three times a year. We watch it happen every day. We’ve seen what works and what doesn’t. We want to help you hire smart. The articles below are the best of our thinking from over twenty years of watching practices hire. When it comes to hiring, we can give you an edge. Whether you engage us to help you or not, you still need to make a smart hire.

Candidates Think the Way You Hire Is the Way You Manage

We all generalize. It’s part of how we get along in life. Sometimes, we generalize inaccurately. In the absence of information to the contrary, candidates assume that delays and un-kept promises they see during the hiring process are the way you manage your practice pretty much all the time. What can look to you like little more than the everyday impact of being busy can look to a candidate like a poorly-managed office, which undermines the positive impression you want to make.

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Fighting the Counter-Offer Battle

In today’s market, you need to be prepared to fight the counter-offer battle. Candidates open the door to a counter-offer for a variety of reasons. Some do it innocuously enough; believing that loyalty compels them to at least listen to what their employer has to say. Some genuinely underestimate the response that a resignation will generate. Not a few think, “Why shouldn’t I see how much they’ll offer me to stay?”

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Retention Starts the Day You Hire

Employee retention starts the day you hire. Why? Because life is about to change for your new employee. The change starts with driving a new route to a new office. There will be new faces, new procedures, maybe even a new city. Things that can look like tiny glitches to you can feel like big problems to your new-hire. Doubts can accumulate and slow the rapid climb to productivity that you’re expecting.

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Employers Are From Venus

During the interview process, you’re doing everything you can do determine whether Candidate A is the right match for your practice. Candidate A is doing the same from his side. And yet, one of the most common pitfalls has to do with mismatched expectations for that critical first three to six months on the job. The basic problem: Employers are from Venus, Candidates are from Mars.

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